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Icon August 9, 2011 - 11:02 Icon - 2 comments

Hol Chan Tags & Releases First Olive Ridley Turtle in Belize

Hol Chan Tags & Releases First Olive Ridley Turtle in Belize

Amazing Turtle Rescue and Release in San Pedro - A few months ago an Olive Ridley Turtle (also commonly known as the Pacific Ridley Turtle) was rescued at the Hol Chan Marine Reserve and has been rehabilitated at the Bacalar Chico National Reserve. The staff at Hol Chan aptly named the turtle “Olive” and she was tagged with a satellite tracking device and released at Hol Chan Marine Reserve on Monday, August 8, 2011.

Dr. Todd Rimkus, a biology teacher from Marymount University, has been working with Kevin Andrewin at Gales Point tagging turtles; Dr. Rimkus donated the tag for Olive to monitor her tracking. Members of the Belize Sea Turtle Conservation Network, including Hol Chan Marine Reserve, Fisheries, Gales Point, CORAL and ECOMAR members were present for the tagging and releasing of Olive.

This was a great opportunity to raise awareness of sea turtle standings, rehabilitations, awareness and other local efforts on-going in Belize with sea turtle conservation. Kevin Andrewin from Gales Point applied the satellite tag on Olive as he has the most experience and has recently tagged two hawksbill turtles at Gales Point.

The tagging of Olive was a historical moment for sea turtles in Belize since this was the first confirmed Olive Ridley Turtle and the fourth ever turtle tagged with a satellite tag in the country. Sea turtles are the great ocean migrates and don’t follow country boundaries.

The Olive Ridley Current Population and Distribution is in the Antilles, around the north coast of South America, in West Africa, the Indian Ocean, Australia and Southeast Asia. There are also many important nesting and feeding grounds on the east Pacific coast from as far north as Canada to as far south as southern Peru.

With the tagging and tracking of Olive biologist will be able to see if Olive will return to the Caribbean Shores for nesting or if it will return to its native waters in South America. You can track the turtles on seaturtle.org or on Facebook; just look for the Belize Sea Turtle Conservation Network page.

Linda Searle of ECOMAR taking a look at Olive.Kevin Andrewin and Grimaldo Acosta taking out Olive from the boat for tagging.Olive - the Olive Ridley (Pacific Ridley) TurtleOlive being carefully lifted from the boat.Amazing Turtle Rescue and Release in San PedroJavier Bardalez (Bacalar Chico Reserve Ranger) personally took care of Olive for four months before her release. Grimaldo Acosta of Hol Chan Marine Reserve.Amazing Turtle Rescue and Release in San PedroJohn Searle measuring the carapace (shell) length. (63 centimetes in length)John Searle measuring the carapace (shell) Width. (55.5 centimetes in width)Olive's fin healing from its injuries.Satellite Tracking and Analysis Tool being attached to the carapace of the turtle.Kevin Andrewin of Gales Point attached the tag to the turtle.Amazing Turtle Rescue and Release in San PedroOlive Ridley being taken to Hol Chan Marine ReserveOlive being released at Hol Chan Marine ReserveOlive being released at Hol Chan Marine Reserve

Comments
September 7, 2011 - 12:42

Great job working together to release this turtle!

August 10, 2011 - 13:15

its a good thing to do, we need to heep track of where our turtles and see where they go we need more programe like that the protected area,s are making enough money to  do more tagging like what was done to olive

     licened tour guide capt. joe

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